• WHITE PLAINS MIDDLE SCHOOL

    HIGHLANDS CAMPUS

     

    SOCIAL STUDIES
     
    MRS. DALY 

    Why Study History?

    “History is certainly about things in the past, and it is filled with interesting stories and fun trivia, but it is as much about what is happening right now, and what is about to happen, as it is about what has already happened, and understanding history can help us to prioritize resources today to improve life tomorrow.” – Unknown author

     

    Welcome to 7th grade Social Studies. The following is a list of expectations and grading criteria:

     

    Class Expectations:

    ·        Attend class regularly and be on time!

    ·        Come to class prepared EACH DAY with binder, pen/pencil and necessary class work.

    ·        Use a separate notebook for social studies.

    ·        Designate a folder or section for social studies handouts only.

    ·        Participate in class discussions.

    ·        Come for extra help if needed during LUNCH.

    ·        Bring headphones to class!

    ·        ASK QUESTIONS!!!!!

     

    Grades:

    Your grades will be based on the quality of your work in the following areas:

    • Homework – Must be handed in on time to receive credit = 20%
    • Quizzes = 20%
    • Tests = 30%
    • Projects & Document Based Question Essays (DBQs) = 15%
    • Class Preparation and Participation = 15%

     

    Late work is unacceptable and will result in a significant point reduction!
     Be responsible and hand everything in on time!
     

    Classroom Behavior

    • Follow directions the first time given.
    • Keep hands, feet and objects to yourself.
    • Raise your hand if you have something to share.
    • Be in your seat and ready to work when the bell rings, not after the bell rings.
    • Show respect for yourself and others.

     

     

    The focus of 7th grade social studies is Early American history. The following topics will be studied:

     

    • ·         Geography                       
    • Native American Indians

    •  Exploration of the Americas
    •  Colonization of the Americas American Revolution
    •  Experiments in New Government
    •   Life in a New Nation
    • Expansion and Division
    • The Civil War
    • Reconstruction
    • Current Events
    •  Document Based Question Essays (DBQs)

     

    “It is possible for one person to make a difference, and you don't have to be a great genius to do it.”

     

                                                                    

                                         

     

    All lessons and class activities will adhere to New York State Social Studies Standards.

     

    Standard 1: History of the United States and New York

    Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments and turning points in the history of the United States and New York.

     

    Standard 2: World History

    Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments and turning points in world history and examine the broad seep of history from a variety of perspectives.

     

    Standard 3: Geography

    Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the geography of the interdependent world in which we live – local, national, and global – including the distribution of people, places, and environments over the Earth’s surface.

     

    Standard 4: Economics

    Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources, how major decision-making units function in the U.S. and other national economies, and how an economy solves the scarcity problem through market and non-market mechanisms.

     

    Standard 5: Civics, Citizenship, and Government

    Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the necessity for establishing governments; the governmental system of the U.S. and other nations; the U.S. Constitution; the basic civic values of American constitutional democracy; and the roles, rights, and responsibilities of citizenship, including avenues of participation.