• TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT

    Technology education provides an opportunity for students to study and learn about the processes and knowledge related to  technologies that are needed to solve problems and extend human capabilities.  Students will be able to use, manage, understand, and assess technologies.  Technology education uses concepts of science, mathematics, social science, and language arts in a hands-on, systems-based approach to problem solving that guides students in the understanding, design and development of systems, devices, and products to improve our lives.

    ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING COMMERCIAL:  Half year – ½ credit, Grades 9-12

    Students will create a design and a model of a store.  Most drawings will be completed using a computer-aided drawing (CAD) program.  Tools and machines will be available for construction of models.  Drawings and model building skills are employed to fulfill project requirements.  In addition, personal career opportunities in construction will be explored. 

    ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING RESIDENTIAL:   Half year – ½ credit, Grades 9-12

    Students will design a house and make the necessary drawings needed for construction.  A model will be constructed from their plans using tools and machines that will be available for the construction of models.  Most drawings will be done with a computer-assisted drawing (CAD) program.  Drawing and model building skills are employed to fulfill project requirements.  In addition, personal career opportunities using architecture and construction will be explored. 

    INDUSTRIAL DESIGN:  Half-year – ½ credit, Grades 9-12

    This course uses a hands-on approach for learning and applying the Engineering Design Process.  Students will learn fundamental skills in measuring, drawing, product research, and materials processing practices.  Emphasis will be on the safe use of a variety of tools to shape different materials, including woods and plastics.  Topics will include measurement, creating precise hand and CAD drawings, reading project plans, refining projects using the design process, and materials processing. 

    ADVANCED INDUSTRIAL DESIGN AND FABRICATION:  Half-year – ½ credit, Grades 9-12

    This course is a continuation and expansion of the materials processing concepts introduced in the Industrial Design course.  Students will build more complex projects, modify plans to incorporate custom fabrications, and create project portfolios.  Students will learn to use wood and CNC lathes, the CNC mill, 3D printer and vacuum former, and will be introduced to acrylic resin and mold-making.  Prerequisite:  Industrial Design

    PROJECT LEAD THE WAY – PATHWAYS TO ENGINEERING

    INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN:  Full year – 1 credit, Grades 9-12

    This is a dual enrollment course offered in collaboration with the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT).  This course is the first in the Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Pathways to Engineering Program, but may be taken on its own to meet graduation elective credit requirements.  In this course, students use the design process and industry standard 3D modeling software to design solutions to solve proposed problems.  Students engage in hands-on, project-based activities while learning the fundamentals of engineering.  This course prepares students to move to the PLTW electives such as Aerospace Engineering and  Biotechnical Engineering. Students must pay the (discounted)  fee for RIT credit to receive a Rochester Institute  of  Technology transcript.  Please note that Introduction to Engineering Design is a prerequisite for most other Project Lead the Way courses.  Students with a desire to pursue engineering should keep this in mind when choosing electives.

    CIVIL ENGINEERING & ARCHITECTURE:  Full year – 1 credit, Grades 9-12

    This is a dual enrollment course offered in collaboration with the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT).  This course is a specialization course in the Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Pathways to Engineering Program.  Students are introduced to key aspects of   building and site design and development as they learn to use computer-assisted architectural design and modeling software.  Throughout the course, students move from structured activities to open-ended projects, completing both residential and commercial designs.  Students apply the engineering design cycle to all problems while applying math and science concepts and developing professional skills such as planning, documentation, communication and presentation of solutions.  Major projects include the design of a small, affordable home; the renovation of a commercial facility; and the design of a small commercial facility that meets a specific community need.  Students must pay the discounted fee for RIT credit to receive a Rochester Institute of Technology transcript.  Prerequisite:  Algebra