• Science Flow Chart        Engineering Flow Chart

     

    SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT

    We offer a variety of science and engineering courses that challenge and support our students.  Courses help students meet New York State and local requirements and prepare students for study beyond high school.  All science honors courses require students to take the Regents Exam (if applicable) at the end of the course as well as a departmental final exam.

    SCIENCE    

    LIVING ENVIRONMENT - BIOLOGY:  Full year - 1 credit, Grades 9-12

    This course provides a sound introduction to biological concepts.  Topics include anatomy and physiology, life processes,  biochemistry, cell structure and function, ecology and evolution. Lab work is an essential and integral part of the course and students must complete the laboratory requirement in order to sit for the Regents Exam in June.  Regents, Honors, and Dual-Language Honors levels are offered for this course.   The Regents Exam is a final exam for both Regents and Honors levels with an additional final exam for the Honors level.  

    APPLIED LIVING ENVIRONMENT:  Full year - 1 credit, Grades 10,11,12

    This course is offered to students who have passed the Regents Living Environment course but who have not yet passed the Living Environment Regents Exam.  A range of topics in biology are approached from the standpoint of current issues in science including genetic engineering, global warming, invasive species, “superbugs”, heart disease, cancer, cloning and species extinction.  Concepts are introduced and /or reinforced with laboratory activities within the class period.  Students are prepared to take the Living  Environment Regents at the conclusion of this course. The 1,200 minute laboratory requirement for this exam must have been completed and documented before enrollment in the course.  Prerequisite: Living Environment with Lab Requirement Complete

    AP BIOLOGY:    Full year - 1 credit, Grades 11,12

    This Advanced Placement course offers the opportunity for highly competent, motivated students to earn college credit in science. Laboratory work is an important and extensive part of the course, and written lab reports are required for all of the AP laboratories.  The course follows the College Board Biology AP Curriculum and the topics included range from mosses to DNA.  All students must complete a final project.   Students are expected to take the Biology Advanced Placement Exam.  Prerequisite: Living Environment and Regents Chemistry

    ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY HONORS:  Full year - 1 credit, Grades 11,12

    This is an intensive, rigorous course that introduces students to the in-depth study of the human body.  The skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine and reproductive systems will be comprehensively addressed.  The cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, excretory and immune systems will be introduced. Lab work is an integral part of the course and lab practical assessments will be a substantial part of the course grade.  This course is appropriate for students intending to enter the health profession and should be considered an introduction to college level work in this area.  Prerequisite:    Living Environment and Regents Chemistry

    EARTH SCIENCE:  Full year - 1 credit, Grades 10,11,12

    This course introduces students to many aspects of geology, astronomy and meteorology, applying these principles to everyday experiences.  The content follows the Regents Core Curriculum for the Physical Setting/Earth Science.  Lab work is an essential and integral part of the course and students must complete the laboratory requirement in order to sit for the Regents Exam in June.   The Regents Exam is the final exam for this course.   Both Regents and Honors levels are offered for this course. The Regents Exam is a final exam for both Regents and Honors levels with an additional final exam for the Honors level.

    CHEMISTRY IN THE COMMUNITY:  Full year - 1 credit, Grades 11,12

    This course stresses application of chemical theory to our technological society.  Students explore chemical content through  hands-on projects, activities and lab experiments.  Although the course is consistent with the Regents Core Curriculum in Chemistry, this course is not designed to prepare students to take the Regents Exam in Chemistry.  Prerequisite: Living Environment, Earth Science, and Algebra

    CHEMISTRY:  Full year - 1 credit, Grades 10,11,12

    This course provides a rigorous presentation of the principles of chemistry.  Topics include matter and energy, atomic theory, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, kinetics and equilibrium, acid and bases, electrochemistry, and organic chemistry.  The course  follows the Regents Core Curriculum in Chemistry and requires abstract reasoning skills and a considerable amount of  problem-solving.  Lab work is an essential and integral part of this course and students must complete the laboratory requirement in order to sit for the Regents Exam in June.  Both Regents and Honors levels are offered for this course.  The Regents Exam is a final exam for both Regents and Honors levels with an additional final exam for the Honors level.  Prerequisite: Earth Science, Living Environment, and Algebra

    AP CHEMISTRY:   Full year - 1 credit, Grades 11, 12

    This Advanced Placement course follows the College Board curriculum.  Topics include atomic and molecular structure, the periodic table of the elements, chemical formulas, equations, thermodynamics, gas laws, chemical bonds, liquids and solids, solutions, chemical equilibrium, electrochemical cells, nuclear reactions, and organic chemistry.  All students must complete a final project.  Students are expected to take the Chemistry Advanced Placement Exam.  Prerequisite: Regents Chemistry, Regents Physics, and Algebra 2 Trig or Administrative Approval

    ACTION PHYSICS:  Full year - 1 credit, Grades 11,12

    This course has two basic aims—to introduce students to the fundamental principles of physics and to show students how physics is applied in their lives and to society.  Action Physics combines activities, projects, theory, applications, and the impact of physical concepts on   everyday life.  This course brings physics to life, developing concepts and demonstrating their relevance.  Main topics include linear motion, Newton’s laws, momentum, work, machines, forces, and waves.  This course ends in a final examination and project.  Although the course is consistent with the Regents Core Curriculum in Physics, this course is not specifically designed to prepare students to take the Regents Exam in Physics.  Prerequisite: Living Environment, Earth Science, and Geometry or Geometry Applications

    PHYSICS:  Full year - 1 credit, Grades 11,12

    This course is a carefully coordinated study of motion, light, dynamics, electricity, magnetism and atomic physics.  Emphasis is placed on student inquiry, experimentation and discovery of the fundamental concepts involved.  This course follows the Regents Core Curriculum in Physics. Laboratory work is an essential and integral part of this course and students must complete the  laboratory requirement in order to sit for the Regents Exam in June.   Both Regents and Honors levels are offered for this course.  The Regents Exam is a final exam for both Regents and Honors levels with an additional final exam for the Honors level.  Prerequisite: Regents Chemistry and Geometry  (Physics Honors requires students to have completed Alg 2 Trig)

    AP PHYSICS  C:  Full year - 1 credit, Grade 12

    This course is an introductory calculus-based course suitable for students who have taken Physics Honors.  The program consists of a thorough and extended treatment of mechanics, electricity, and magnetism.   The course of study is the College Board Physics Advanced  Placement Program.  All students must complete a final project.  All students are expected to take the Physics Advanced Placement Exam.  Prerequisite: Physics Honors and Pre-Calculus Honors

    AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE:  Full year - 1 credit, Grades 11,12

    This course is a rigorous laboratory course for students with a strong background in science and the ability and motivation to work at the college level.  It is an interdisciplinary curriculum that draws from both Life and Physical Sciences, allowing the teacher and  students to approach the material in a variety of ways.  The course provides a wonderful opportunity for students to engage in true inquiry learning through field investigations and lab work in a context that can earn them college credit.  This course follows the College Board Curriculum for Environmental Science Advanced Placement.  All students are expected to take the Environmental Science Advanced Placement Exam.  Prerequisite:  Living Environment and Regents Chemistry

    BILINGUAL SCIENCE LITERACY: Full Year  - 1 credit, Grades 9, 10

    This course is for Spanish-speaking students who have had limited formal science education in previous years.  It provides the building blocks of science practices and skills while exploring foundational content to prepare students to succeed in Bilingual or ENL Living Environment in future years.  The course ends in a final exam. 

    SCIENCE ELECTIVE COURSES

    FORENSIC SCIENCE:  Full year - 1 credit, Grade 12 

    This is an introduction to scientific criminal investigation.  There will be practical applications of skills learned in previous science courses.  Analysis of physical evidence (hair, blood, prints, and chemicals) will be made, studied and closely correlated to classroom lectures.  Prerequisite:  Living Environment and an additional Science Regents credit 

    SUPA FORENSICS:  Full year – 1 credit, Grade 12

    This is a dual-enrollment course between White Plains High School and Syracuse University.  Forensic Science is focused upon the application of scientific methods and techniques to crime and law. Recent advances in scientific methods and principles have had an enormous   impact upon law enforcement and the entire criminal justice system. This course is intended to provide an introduction to understanding the science behind crime detection. Scientific methods specifically relevant to crime detection and analysis will be presented with emphasis placed upon the techniques used in evaluating physical evidence. Topics include blood analysis, organic and inorganic evidence analysis, microscopic investigations, hair analysis, DNA, drug chemistry and toxicology, fiber comparisons, paints, glass compositions and fragmentation, fingerprints, soil comparisons, and arson investigations. Lab work is an essential and integral part of the course, and there is a separate required lab period on alternate days.  Laboratory exercises will include techniques commonly employed in forensic investigations.  Students who pay the discounted fee to SU will receive a Syracuse University transcript.  This course receives Honors weighting.  Prerequisite:  Regents Chemistry

    SCIENCE RESEARCH 1: Full year - 1 credit, Grade 10    Prerequisite:    Interview and Application

    SCIENCE RESEARCH 2: Full year - 1 credit, Grade 11    Prerequisite:    Science Research 1 

    SCIENCE RESEARCH 3: Full year - 1 credit, Grade 12    Prerequisite:    Science Research 2

    This is a dual enrollment course offered in collaboration with SUNY Albany.  These honors level courses are designed to provide students with an understanding of research methods in the sciences.  The sequence is directed to self-motivated students who have a keen interest in science and would like to pursue excellence and progress into areas of original research.  For further information, see Special Courses in this catalog.   This course receives Honors weighting.

    HUMAN ORIGINS AND EVOLUTION:  Full Year - 1 credit, Grades 10,11,12

    As discoveries about human evolution become known, scientists are unlocking some wild facts about human evolution.  For example, are hiccups leftover from when we were aquatic species?  In other words, who are we and how are we unique?  Class discussions will revolve around technology, artificial intelligence, religion, and the gene pool, while we examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of the evolutionary process, and trace a pathway of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  Students will build an understanding with debates, projects, hands-on and virtual lab investigations, and field trips.  Prerequisite:  Living Environment and Earth Science

    MARINE SCIENCE:  Full Year - 1 credit, Grades 10,11,12

    The Marine Science course is a full year science elective which builds on students’ fundamental understandings of both physical science and biology.  Throughout the year, the science of oceanography (the chemistry of seawater, the relationship between the oceans and the atmosphere, how seawater circulation works, and how the tides and coastal activities influence our lives) will be integrated with the biology of the oceans.  Students will learn about the plant life, invertebrate life, vertebrate life and myriad of ecosystems that relay on the oceans for survival, as well as how human activity has influenced the current state of our oceans.  Students will be required to approach these topics with a discerning eye and challenge their own understanding both socially and ethnically.  Students will build understanding with lab investigations and field trips.  However, the course does not include a separate lab period in the schedule.  Prerequisite:  Living Environment and Earth Science

    ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY AND HUMAN IMPACT:  Full year – 1 credit, Grades 10,11,12

    This course is designed to bring awareness to students about global climate changes, dynamic changes within Earth’s many ecosystems, and how human impact has played a significant role in our current global climate shift. Throughout this course, students will engage in case  studies and defense of policies, debate and Socratic discussions.  Students will also participate in student-lead research projects, hands-on laboratory activities, and supplemental experiences designed to provide them with a greater understanding of how our environment is currently shifting.  While hands-on laboratory activities will be an integral part of the course, there is no separate lab period in the schedule.  The first semester of this course will focus on human population growth, carrying capacities of different regions of the Earth, our utilization of natural resources, and the dynamics of our local ecosystem.  The second semester will focus on specific ways in which humans have impacted our environment. This semester will include topics such as air, water, and soil pollution as well as less commonly known human impacts such as sound and light pollution.  Prerequisite:  Living Environment and Earth Science; Additional successful completion of a chemistry-centered course is recommended, but not required.

    INTRODUCTION TO HORTICULTURE:  Full Year  - 1 credit, Grades 10,11,12

    This course is designed to introduce students to the principles and practices in the development, production and use of horticultural crops (fruits, vegetables, greenhouse, turf, nursery, floral and landscape).  The course will include the study of classification, structure, growth and development of plants, plant propagation, environmental influences on horticultural plants, horticultural technology, and an introduction to the horticultural industries.  Students will examine fundamental concepts integral to all aspects of production and management such as climate, soil, culture, pest management, harvesting and storage.  Additionally, the class will identify emerging issues in horticulture and encourage robust discussion. Students will apply their knowledge and skills by designing and maintaining the school garden and other plantings around the school grounds.  Prerequisite:  Living Environment and Earth Science

    THE GEOLOGY OF THE NATIONAL PARKS:  Full Year  - 1 credit, Grades 10,11,12

    Do you ever wish you could travel to Yellowstone National Park or the Grand Canyon?  Do you ever wonder how the National Parks started and what makes something a national park or national monument?  Are you curious about the culture, the history, the economic livelihood, the careers, and the geology that makes up the national parks in the United States as well as on other continents?  This course discusses the geologic phenomena that shapes our national parks.  Students will build an understanding of geology through virtual field trips, projects, hands-on lab investigations, and actual field trips.  Prerequisites:  Living Environment and Earth Science

    Medical Terminology (Dual-Language):  Full Year  - 1 credit, Grades 11,12

    This course will introduce students to common medical terms used in health related areas in both Spanish and English. Prefixes, suffixes, and word roots will be stressed. The anatomy of the human body, disease process, and surgical and diagnostic procedures will be presented along with the medical terminology. The course will help to prepare students for courses needed to become a medical translator or work in health-related fields.  Prerequisite: Living Environment and  Earth Science; Spanish Language Arts 3 or equivalent

    TECHNOLOGY

    Technology education provides an opportunity for students to study and learn about the processes and knowledge related to  technologies that are needed to solve problems and extend human capabilities.  Students will be able to use, manage, understand, and assess technologies.  Technology education uses concepts of science, mathematics, social science, and language arts in a hands-on, systems-based approach to problem solving that guides students in the understanding, design and development of systems, devices, and products to improve our lives.

    ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING COMMERCIAL: Half year – ½ credit, Grades 9-12

    Students will create a design and a model of a store.  Most drawings will be completed using a computer-aided drawing (CAD) program.  Tools and machines will be available for construction of models.  Drawings and model building skills are employed to fulfill project requirements.  In addition, personal career opportunities in construction will be explored. 

    ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING RESIDENTIAL: Half year – ½ credit, Grades 9-12

    Students will design a house and make the necessary drawings needed for construction.  A model will be constructed from their plans using tools and machines that will be available for the construction of models.  Most drawings will be done with a   computer-assisted drawing (CAD) program.  Drawing and model building skills are employed to fulfill project requirements.  In  addition, personal career opportunities using architecture and construction will be explored. 

    INDUSTRIAL DESIGN: Half-year – ½ credit, Grades 9-12

    This course uses a hands-on approach for learning and applying the Engineering Design Process.  Students will learn fundamental skills in measuring, drawing, product research, and materials processing practices.  Emphasis will be on the safe use of a variety of tools to shape different materials, including woods and plastics.  Topics will include measurement, creating precise hand and CAD drawings, reading project plans, refining projects using the design process, and materials processing. 

    ADVANCED INDUSTRIAL DESIGN AND FABRICATION: Half-year – ½ credit, Grades 9-12

    This course is a continuation and expansion of the materials processing concepts introduced in the Industrial Design course.  Students will build more complex projects, modify plans to incorporate custom fabrications, and create project portfolios.  Students will learn to use wood and CNC lathes, the CNC mill, 3D printer and vacuum former, and will be introduced to acrylic resin and mold-making.   Prerequisite: Industrial Design

    PROJECT LEAD THE WAY – PATHWAYS TO ENGINEERING

    INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN:  Full year – 1 credit, Grades 9-12

    This is a dual enrollment course offered in collaboration with the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT).  This course is the first in the Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Pathways to Engineering Program, but may be taken on its own to meet graduation elective credit requirements.  In this course, students use the design process and industry standard 3D modeling software to design solutions to solve proposed problems.  Students engage in hands-on, project-based activities while learning the fundamentals of engineering.  This course prepares students to move to the PLTW electives such as Aerospace Engineering and  Biotechnical Engineering. Students must pay the discounted fee for RIT credit to receive a Rochester Institute of Technology transcript.  Please note that Introduction to Engineering Design is a prerequisite for many other Project Lead the Way courses.  Students with a  desire to pursue engineering should keep this in mind when choosing electives.

    AEROSPACE ENGINEERING: Full year – 1 credit, Grades 10,11,12

    This course is a specialization course in the Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Pathways to Engineering Program.  Through activities, projects and problems, students explore the evolution of flight, flight fundamentals, navigation and control, aerospace materials, propulsion, space travel, orbital mechanics, ergonomics, remotely operated systems and related careers.  Students engage in hands-on, project-based activities while learning the fundamental of aerospace engineering.  Prerequisite:  Introduction to Engineering Design 

    BIOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING: Full year – 1 credit, Grades 10,11,12

    This course is a specialization course in the Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Pathways to Engineering Program.  Hands-on projects engage students in engineering design problems related to biomechanics, cardiovascular engineering, genetic engineering, tissue engineering, biomedical devices, forensics and bioethics.   Prerequisite: Introduction to Engineering Design or administrative approval

    CIVIL ENGINEERING & ARCHITECTURE: Full year – 1 credit, Grades 9-12

    This is a dual enrollment course offered in collaboration with the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT).  This course is a specialization course in the Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Pathways to Engineering Program.  Students are introduced to key aspects of building and site design and development as they learn to use computer-assisted architectural design and modeling software.  Throughout the course, students move from structured activities to open-ended projects, completing both residential and commercial designs.  Students apply the engineering design cycle to all problems while applying math and science concepts and developing professional skills such as planning, documentation, communication and presentation of solutions.  Major projects include the design of a small, affordable home; the renovation of a commercial facility; and the design of a small commercial facility that meets a specific community need.  Students must pay the discounted fee for RIT credit to receive a Rochester Institute of Technology transcript.  Prerequisite:  Algebra

    PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING HONORS: Full year – 1 credit, Grades 11,12

    This is a dual enrollment course offered in collaboration with the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT).  This course is a foundation course in the Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Pathways to Engineering Program.  In it, students are  exposed to major concepts like mechanisms, energy, statics, materials, and kinematics.  All students must have taken, or be taking, Regents or Honors Physics at the same time as this course.  Students must pay the discounted fee for RIT credit to receive a Rochester Institute of Technology transcript.  Prerequisite: Introduction to Engineering Design; Algebra 2 Trigonometry or co-reguisite Regents Physics

    ENGINEERING DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT HONORS: Full year – 1 credit, Grade 12

    This is the capstone course in the Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Pathways to Engineering Program.  In it, students identify an issue and then research, design, and test a solution, ultimately presenting their solution to a panel of engineers.  Students apply the professional skills they have developed to document a design process to standards.  This course ends in a required project presentation to professional engineers and school administration.  Prerequisite: Principles of Engineering

    Please Note:  Computer Science Principles (see page 31) can also be used as a specialization course in the Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Pathways to Engineering Program.